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Home » News and Events » SEEING THROUGH THE EYES OF DIABETICS

SEEING THROUGH THE EYES OF DIABETICS

Poor circulation associated with diabetes imposes adverse consequences for various parts of the body, including the eyes. The fact is that the blood vessels in the eye are particularly vulnerable. As a result, diabetics are 25 times more likely to become blind than those without the disorder. The problem can be traced to “diabetic retinopathy,” which occurs when blood vessels in the retina leak, close, or produce new growth that leads to fluid buildup, bleeding, and scarring. Symptoms of diabetic retinopathy include seeing spots/floaters in the field of vision, blurred vision, a dark spot in central vision, and/or difficulty with night vision. The American Optometric Association recommends that diabetics schedule an annual  comprehensive dilated eye examination to check for problems. 

High blood-sugar levels can damage blood vessels in the retina, which senses light and sends images to the brain.  The damage to the retinal vessels is called diabetic retinopathy.  Whether you are diabetic or pre-diabetic, it is important to maintain strict control of your blood sugar and have routine eye exams. Better control of blood sugar levels can help diabetics slow the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy